For a map of the SWCC projects from 2010-2017 you can download GIS point, line, and polygon shapefiles here (under CFLRP Restoration heading) or a Google Earth file here(15MB). After downloading the file, open Google Earth and add the file using: File > Open.

Examples of Projects that would not have happened without CFLRP funding

Trail Creek Bridge at Cottonwood Lakes Road crossing of Trail Creek (Lolo NF)

o The previous condition was an undersized culvert that created increased road maintenance and a partial fish barrier that impaired access to approximately 11 miles of upstream habitat. The pipe size was approximately half the width of the stream channel. Notice the large scour pool below outlet of culvert caused by constricting the natural stream flow. The scour pool also is scouring the road fill causing a narrowing of the road and excessive sediment delivery to the stream.

o The project was completed in 2012 with CFLRP funds at approximately $135k. Bridge can now accommodate flood flow providing for passage of bedload and logs while providing for upstream passage of aquatic organisms. No road or bridge maintenance was required during or after the 2018 flood event and the project reduced long-term road maintenance at the site. Reconnected approximately 11 miles of upstream connectivity for westslope cutthroat trout, bull trout, and western pearlshell mussels, as well as other aquatic species.

Old culvert, prior to replacement.

Old culvert, prior to replacement.

New Trail Creek bridge during 2018 high-water.

New Trail Creek bridge during 2018 high-water.


Stonewall Creek Restoration Project (Lincoln District, Helena - Lewis & Clark NF)

Stonewall Creek post-treatment. The creek is under the trees on the left.

Stonewall Creek post-treatment. The creek is under the trees on the left.

In partnership with the Big Blackfoot Chapter of Trout Unlimited, the HNF reclaimed approximately 4,200 feet of Stonewall Creek where past mining activity changed the natural stream channel and fisheries habitat. The project consisted of removing large unconsolidated piles of rock processed during past mining activities. Rock material was moved to the junction of Forest Service roads #607 and #607-F1 for use on future road maintenance. After rock removal, in-stream and riparian habitat improvements included placement of rocks, log jams and other natural debris, also planting native riparian grasses, forbs, and shrubs. Stream banks were stabilized, slope of upper terrace banks was reduced, and soil was placed on areas of exposed rock to promote revegetation.